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SCOTUS permits Alabama to ban curbside voting

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U.S. Supreme Court

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Three U.S. Supreme Court justices dissented Wednesday when the excessive court docket allowed Alabama’s secretary of state to ban curbside voting.

U.S. District Judge Abdul Kallon of the Northern District of Alabama had blocked the secretary of state’s curbside voting ban after concluding that it violated the Americans with Disabilities Act. A Supreme Court majority stayed the choose’s injunction whereas the litigation continues.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote the dissent, joined by Justices Stephen G. Breyer and Elena Kagan.

Kallon had dominated that the curbside voting ban violated the ADA as a result of it pressured folks with disabilities to danger subjection to the novel coronavirus in the event that they wished to vote in individual. The injunction didn’t pressure counties to undertake curbside voting; it merely gave counties the choice.

The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Atlanta let stand that a part of the federal choose’s ruling.

Sotomayor mentioned she “would not upset the district court’s record-based, reasoned and narrowly tailored judgment.”

“To combat the spread of COVID–19, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that states consider curbside voting, that is, permit voters to vote from their car by handing their ballot to a poll worker,” Sotomayor wrote. “This is no radical recommendation.”

About 28 different states and Washington, D.C., already allow curbside voting, Sotomayor mentioned.

Sotomayor cited the phrases of one of many plaintiffs, a Black man in his 70s with bronchial asthma and Parkinson’s illness.

“So many of my [ancestors] even died to vote. And while I don’t mind dying to vote, I think we’re past that—we’re past that time,” he mentioned.

The case is Merrill v. People First of Alabama.

Bloomberg Law, the Washington Post and SCOTUSblog are among the many publications with protection of the court docket’s order.

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